Home ITACA : Multimedia_page : Single multimedia
bea2


Today, around 55% of the world’s population lives in cities and this is projected to increase to 68% by 2050. Concentrated traffic and other urban activities mean that air quality levels in cities are detrimental to the human health. The European Union (EU) has established a regulatory framework to control and improve air quality levels in cities (Directive 2008/50/EC) through fixed stations. Valencia only has seven stations.

The research group ICT against Climate Change of the ITACA institute of the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), together with the company Mesura, the social platform València per l’aire and the Joint Research Center (JRC) of the European Commission, has designed and installed a network of 424 mobile passive dosimetry sensors distributed throughout the city for the measurement of NO2 with the aim of evaluating the air quality reported by the official fixed stations during the period 2017-2019.

According to José Vicente Oliver, director of the research group and professor at the UPV, the results obtained show that during these three years 43.7% of mobile sensors exceeded the limit value established by the EU Directive as well as by the Organization World Health Organization (WHO).

“This indicates that the air quality levels offered by the fixed stations are not representative or reliable for monitoring the city’s air quality. Thus, the fixed stations that currently operate do not provide accurate information on the areas of the city where the majority of the population breathes air with the highest level of pollution. Specifically, the results show that 34.6% of citizens (273,000) live in areas with an average annual value higher than the recommended limit for the protection of human health ”, says Oliver.

The UPV researcher and project coordinator Edgar Lorenzo adds that “the study reveals that while the seven official air quality stations do not exceed the annual mean limit of NO2 concentration values (40 μg m−3), the annual mean values of NO2 from the complementary mobile network exceed this limit in almost half of the total mobile sampling locations ”.

These are the neighborhoods with the worst air quality

The UPV team has developed, based on big data tools, an index that identifies and classifies the 69 neighborhoods according to the level of pollution and the exposure of the population to the concentration of pollutants. And this is the conclusion: the neighborhoods with the worst air quality are Benicalap, Beniferri, Torrefiel, Rascanya and Benimaclet in the north, l’Olivereta, Nou Moles, Arrancapins, Patraix and Jesús in the west, Malilla in the south, El Grao and Nazareth in the east and Russafa in the center of the city.

In addition, Edgar Lorenzo adds that “the seven stations are not well located according to the real exposure of the population to pollution, since they do not measure the air quality in the city in a representative way. Only one is located in a representative area (Russafa), the rest should be installed in Benicalap, Arrancapins, Malilla, Nou Moles, Patraix and Torrefiel ”.

The results of this study have recently been published by the scientific journal Environmental Research Letters. The research has been possible thanks to the collaboration agreement between the UPV, the Valencia City Council and the EU JRC, framed in the Chair of Governança of the city of València.

According to the Deputy Mayor of the Democracy Participation, Rights and Innovation Area, Elisa Valía, “based on the results obtained from this three-year investigation, the Department of Transparency and Open Government of the Valencia City Council is very interested in that UPV researchers continue to advance in the study of the relationship between the distribution of pollutants and the socio-cultural and economic characteristics of the neighborhoods to evaluate environmental justice and equity, together with an analysis of the different pollutants and their influences on the cardiorespiratory -including COVID- and oncological illnesses”.

Reference
Edgar Lorenzo-Sáez, Jose-Vicente Oliver-Villanueva, Lenin-Guillermo Lemus-Zúñiga, Eloina Coll-Aliaga, Carolina Perpiñá Castillo and Carlo Lavalle. Assessment of an air quality surveillance network through passive pollution measurement with mobile sensors. Environmental Research Letters, Volume 16, Number 5. doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/abe435

 

Source: UPV’s Information Office


Jeanologia, a leading company in the development of sustainable and eco-efficient technologies, and the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) launch the Jeanologia Mission Zero Chair of transversal sustainability, to contribute to the development of a more efficient, sustainable and transparent industry, promoting the training of young people to achieve a future that is respectful of people and the planet.
 
Source: UPVTV


Jeanologia, a leading company in the development of sustainable and eco-efficient technologies, and the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) launch the Jeanologia Mission Zero Chair of transversal sustainability, to contribute to the development of a more efficient, sustainable and transparent industry, promoting the training of young people to achieve a future respectful for people and the planet.

This new business Chair was created with the desire to integrate the contributions of all the UPV campuses, centers, departments and research institutes related to sustainability and the circular economy. To this end, they are committed “to a model that combines training, research and practice in the face of the new needs and profiles demanded by the market,” they stand out from the Jeanologia Mission Zero Chair.

The act of signing the agreement to create the Chair took place at the UPV, with the interventions of Enrique Silla, CEO of Jeanologia; Francisco J. Mora, Rector of the UPV and José Millet, Vice-rector of Employment and Entrepreneurship of the UPV, among other assistants. It should be noted that the financing of the chair comes from the endowment of the 2018 Rei Jaume I Entrepreneur Award, which was awarded to the businessman Enrique Silla.

A union of talent, research and business

From Jeanologia they highlight that “talent and innovation are key for companies on their way to sustainability; the new generations are the ones who are acting as the engine of change and will be the ones who will lead the search for environmental solutions in the future ”.

For this reason, they affirm, it is necessary to unite talent, research and business, creating synergies to jointly disseminate the new business culture. In which, as Enrique Silla, CEO of Jeanologia points out, “the company is the engine to transform the world, since we are convinced that there is a new way of doing business, in which the final objective does not focus only on the economic benefit ”.

“At Jeanologia we know how to do it”, Enrique Silla stressed, “we have been demonstrating for many years that a new way of producing, completely efficient, ethical and sustainable, is possible, what we call Mission Zero. That is why we are increasingly committed to sharing our know-how and promoting innovative projects contributing to the development of a more sustainable future ”.

A disruptive company

For Francisco Mora, Rector of the UPV, the Jeanologia Mission Zero Chair is a great opportunity for the Universitat Politècnica de València. “I was lucky enough to visit Jeanologia and was impressed by its intensive use of technology and its focus on caring for the environment and people. It is a great company with which we share objectives and collaboration will be very beneficial for society ”.

For José Millet, Vice-Rector for Employment and Entrepreneurship at the UPV, Jeanologia is a disruptive company, marked by the leadership of its CEO Enrique Silla: “It has a vision, it puts the means to make it a reality and it achieves it.” For Millet, this is the last Chair signed with him as vice-rector “it is a perfect finishing touch, because it brings together all the characteristics that we want in a chair, with activities aimed at the general good.”

The event was attended by, along with the top managers of Jeanologia and the UPV: José Manuel Catalá, Director of the Institute of Information and Communication Technologies (ITACA) of the UPV, where the Chair will be located; Carmina Gil, Head of the UPV’s Integrated Employment Service; Francisco Sales Castells, Professor at the UPV and Director of the Jeanologia Mission Zero Chair; Carmen Silla, Head of Marketing and Victoria Puchol, researcher at the company.

More than 25 years betting on an eco-efficient textile industry

Since its birth in 1994, Jeanologia’s mission has been to create an ethical, sustainable and eco-efficient textile industry, through its disruptive technologies and know-how. The company highlights that, through their disruptive laser technologies, G2 ozone, e-flow systems, Smart Boxes, Colorbox and H2Zero, they have revolutionized the textile industry “offering infinite possibilities of design and garment finishing while saving water, energy and chemicals, eliminates waste and harmful emissions ”. Likewise, they highlight that more than 35% of the 5,000 million jeans produced each year in the world are made with their technologies and that they have earned the trust of the main brands in the market.

More info:

News on UPV TV

 

Source: UPV’s Information Office


A total of 75 people out of 150 participants have found work. These are the results, so far, of the European project EDIBO (European Digital Bootcamps) that seeks to promote training and job placement for young people and respond to work needs in the field of ICT, information and communication technologies.
 
Source: UPVTV


A total of 75 people out of 150 participants have found work. These are the results, so far, of the European project EDIBO (European Digital Bootcamps) that seeks to promote the training and labor insertion of youth and respond to work needs in the field of ICT, information technologies and communications.

The Universitat Politècnica de Valencia (UPV) is one of the seven European entities participating in this project, which is aimed at people between 18 and 29 years old who are not studying or working and who are at risk of social or labor exclusion. According to Lenin Lemus, professor at the UPV, researcher at the ITACA Institute of UPV and principal investigator of the project, “in the selection process, the applications made by women and immigrants have been prioritized”.

Theory and practices in companies

The training consists of a theoretical part and an internship part in companies “which last year had to be reduced due to COVID-19,” explains Professor Lemus.

EDIBO offers an intensive 10-week training in information and communication technologies. They are à la carte courses whose content is defined based on the needs detected in a group of collaborating companies.

50% job placement

With the results of the courses already taken, of the 150 people who have been trained, with a dropout rate of 24%, they have managed to get 100 people to graduate and 75 to get a work contract. Data that according to Professor Lenin Lemus have been thanks to the “sum of efforts of public administrations, companies and universities and thus it is possible to increase labor insertion”.

The EDIBO project is sponsored by the financial mechanism EEA and Norway Grants Fund for Youth Employment and the UPV participates in it together with institutions from five other European countries: Latvia, Lithuania, Bulgaria, Greece and Italy. It has a total financial endowment of about 1,700,000 euros, of which 283,000 are managed by the Univesitat Politècnica de València.

The project started in October 2018 and will end in October this year. By then, after the 36-month duration of the project, EDIBO will have trained a total of 1,050 people, facilitating their access to the world of work.

More info:

News on UPV TV

 

Source: UPV’s Information Office


The Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), through the group of Technological Innovations for Health and Well-being (SABIEN) of its Institute of Applications of Information and Communication Technologies (ITACA-UPV), coordinates the ESCAPE4HEALTH project, co-financed by the Erasmus + program of the European Union and whose objective is to explore the potential of escape rooms in the field of education and health training.

They facilitate the learning of complex concepts

“Both technical and non-technical clinical skills are essential for medical and health students and professionals,” says Álvaro Fides (SABIEN-ITACA), “and recently, scientific articles such as that by Oscar Rosenkrantz and others, have detailed how the non-technical ones can be transferred to a simulation-based training environment ”.

The model is that of escape rooms, challenging teams of participants to solve a series of tests and puzzles in a closed thematic space with the aim of reaching a certain goal in a limited time.

“This approach,” says Fides, “provides a valuable perspective on the dynamics of teamwork, and exercises like these have great potential to facilitate the learning of complex concepts.”

Geared towards Generation Z students

Mainly, ESCAPE4HEALTH is aimed at “new students of the so-called Generation Z” – born, approximately, between the second half of the 90s and the first decade of the 21st century – “who prefer more innovative styles of education, such as gamification, that defy their expectations. This provides them with a greater interprofessional learning experience than the one they could have in a conventional center.

Furthermore, it should be taken into account that the project “will go beyond the traditional escape room”, continues the UPV researcher, “by introducing scenarios within virtual reality and augmented reality environments”.

The usefulness of virtual reality

“The usefulness of virtual reality in this context has already been demonstrated”, explains Fides, adding that it “will allow remote teaching to be carried out, facilitating its deployment in facilities where there is little space or lack of props for a conventional escape room. in addition to mitigating the problem of face-to-face education during the current pandemic or similar situations in the future ”.

Ultimately, the project will analyze the validity and acceptance of escape rooms in the health curriculum, involving students, teachers and administrators during the creation of these experiences.

Participants

Together with the UPV, ESCAPE4HEALTH is made up of four other European institutions: the Laurea University of Applied Sciences (Finland), the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece), the Association for Medical Education in Europe (United Kingdom), and the Region of Hovedstaden (Denmark).

For the UPV, Vicente Traver Salcedo (SABIEN-ITACA director and official coordinator), Lucía Aparici Tortajada, Manuel Traver Salcedo and Álvaro Fides Valero participate in the project.

Source: UPV’s Information Office


We want to congratulate the women who work in our institute and thank them for their efforts. Your important contribution makes us better.
 
We also want to second the Statement by the European Commission ahead of International Women’s Day 2021. Gender equality must be at the heart of the post-pandemic recovery.


We want to congratulate the women who work in our institute and thank them for their efforts. Your important contribution makes us better.

 

We also want to second the Statement by the European Commission ahead of International Women’s Day 2021. Gender equality must be at the heart of the post-pandemic recovery.


The spin-off of the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón and the ITACA Institute of Universitat Politècnica de Valencia, which has developed a medical device to diagnose arrhythmias, has opened a financing round of €600,000 through the Capital Cell platform, according to Andreu Climent, founder and CEO of the company.
 
Source: Corify Care


Corify Care is in search of capital to further develop. The spin-off of the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón and the ITACA Institute of Universitat Politècnica de Valencia, which has developed a medical device to diagnose arrhythmias, has opened a financing round of €600,000 through the Capital Cell platform, according to Andreu Climent, founder and CEO of the company.

Corify Care work with the aim of improving the effectiveness of treatments against cardiac arrhythmias. The Acorys® medical device allows mapping the heart in a non-invasive way for an accurate diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias and the identification of its optimal treatment. The technology is patented and the clinical feasibility studies have been successful.

Corify Care is completing the development of Acorys® with the support of the Center for Industrial Technological Development (CDTI) of the Ministry of Industry, which has supported them with € 1M, and the European Institute of Innovation and Technology, which in addition to financing them with € 750,000 has awarded them as the most innovative project of the year 2020.

The Corify Care round will be 600,000 EUR, led by Genesis Biomed, on behalf of a family office in Barcelona that co-invests with 300,000 EUR. The objective of this round of Corify Care is to achieve the CE marking and start commercialization before 2023.

Corify Care’s pre-money valuation for this round is EUR 6M, with an expected exit in 2026 for EUR 150M and an expected multiplier for investors from the current round of X16.

The Corify Care round will be available at Capital Cell from February 26, 2021, with a 10% discount until March 17, 2021 or until the end of the round for investments of € 15,000 or more.

On February 25, 2021, at 6:00 p.m., Corify Care will make a Deal Üp! If you are interested in investing or you know someone who may be interested, please do not hesitate to register or write to mailto:acliment@corify.es.

Source: Corify Care